Super Glue

August 28, 2006 at 5:51 pm Leave a comment


Ever wonder why super glue sticks most everything?
From What makes super glue so super?” on science.howstuffworks.com

“Super glue deserves its name — a single drop can permanently join your thumb to your index finger faster than you can say “Whoops,” and a 1-square-inch bond can hold more than a ton. So how does this remarkable substance work? The answer lies in its main ingredient, cyanoacrylate (C5H5NO2, for you chemistry buffs). Cyanoacrylate is an acrylic resin that cures (forms its strongest bond) almost instantly. The only trigger it requires is the hydroxyl ions in water, which is convenient since virtually any object you might wish to glue will have at least trace amounts of water on its surface.

White glues, such as Elmer’s, bond by solvent evaporation. The solvent in Elmer’s all-purpose school glue is water. When the water evaporates, the polyvinylacetate latex that has spread into a material’s crevices forms a flexible bond. Super glue, on the other hand, undergoes a process called anionic polymerization. Cyanoacrylate molecules start linking up when they come into contact with water, and they whip around in chains to form a durable plastic mesh. The glue thickens and hardens until the thrashing molecular strands can no longer move…” (read more)

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LINKS:
Super Glue website
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Entry filed under: materials, uncategorized.

Mark di Suvero Glue this to that

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